Monday, 25 November 2013

5--HISTORY OF KASHMIR AND ITS RULERS -

CHAPTER—5 Of (15)

HISTORY OF KASHMIR AND ITS RULERS

Picture clicked @ "OM BEACH" Karwar, Karnataka


The Brief History of Kashmir & its rulers

The Kashmir valley was ruled in a sequence, by Hindu Rulers, Buddhist Rulers, Muslim Rulers, Mughal Rulers, Afghan Rulers, Sikh Rulers and then the last were Dogara Rulers.




If not, for the adamant, stubborn, unyielding, inflexible KASHMIRI PANDITS of those years, who ardently refused the regular humble requests of the Buddhist Ruler Rinchang, (a Tibetian from Ladakh  who ruled Kashmir (1320-23), to adopt Hinduism?

Rinchang out of disgust later adopted Islam & Muslimism? Seeing the King converted to Islam, many of his loyal subjects too got converted to Islam. This laid the foundation of conversion of Hindus to Muslimism.

Had adamant Kashmiri Pandits agreed to the request of the Buddhist King to adopt Hiduism, the conversion to Islam could have been deferred by at least half a century.




From time to time, during the periods of brutal Muslim rulers, especially during the heinously, brutal and merciless Afghan Rulers and Mughal ruler Aurangzeb, most of the Hindus were converted.

There were three types of Hindus, first one were those, who under little force and little monetary gains immediately agreed to convert to Islam.

Then the second types were those, who initially refused to convert. But, as they were regularly coaxed and threatened, they finally yielded and agreed to forceful adoption to Islam.




Then the third types were those, the toughest of the lot, who even after threatening, refused to convert. They were finally brutally butchered, beheaded and to cause more scare in society, their mutilated bodies were dragged, crucified and horrified displayed throughout the valley. They preferred to die rather than conversion to Islam.




The last types were the meek, weak, docile and timid ones, who were fulltime dedicated to idol worship. These Hindus to survive had to pay heavy taxation, not as per each family, but as per each head of the family. That’s why Hindus started having small numbers of the family members, so that they have to pay small taxes. By paying ill-affordable taxation, many Hindus became  poor, poorer and the poorest. Whereas Muslims started having  bigger families and started enjoying the bigger monetary comforts of conversion to Islam.

That is why because of olden years of heavy “Hindu-taxation”, today Muslims number in Kashmir valley, are enormously more than those of Kashmiri Pandits.

A SMALL NARRATION THAT WE KASHMIRI PANDITS SHOULD BE THANKFUL TO SIKH COMMUNITY, WHOSE “9TH GURU, GURU TEGH BAHADUR JI” on (11th Nov. 1675), GAVE SAHEEDI, MARTYRDOM OF HIS PRECIOUS LIFE JUST TO SAVE US, KASHMIRI PANDITS FROM CONVERSION TO ISLAM.

Myself being a Kashmiri Pandit, It's my request that all the "kashmiri Pandit" organisations from all over the world, under whatever banner they may be, at least to honour the divine sacrifice of "Guru Tegh Bahadurji" sholud pay collective tributes  on his " SAHEEDI DAY" that come on 11th of Nov. every year 

The Muhhal Emperor, Aurangzeb cherished the obsession with the ambition of converting India into an Islamic country.

A minority of the conversions of Kashmiri Pandits in Kashmir happened peacefully. Yet, the Emperor's experiment was carried out in Kashmir. The viceroy of Kashmir, Iftikhar Khan (1671–1675) carried out the policy vigorously and set about converting non-Muslims by force.

A group of  Kashmiri Pandits (Kashmiri Hindu Brahmins), approached Tegh Bahadur for help. They, on the advice of the Guru, told the Mughal authorities that they would willingly embrace Islam if Tegh Bahadur did the same.

Orders of the arrest of the Guru were issued by Aurangzeb, who was in the present-day Khyber Pakhtunhwa of Pakistan  subduing Pushrun rebellion. The Guru was arrested at a place called Malikhpur near Anandpur after he had departed from Anandpur for Delhi. Before departing he nominated his son, Gobind Rai (Guru Gobind Singh) as the next Sikh Guru.

He was arrested, along with some of his followers, Bhai Dayal, Bhai Mati Das and Bhai Sati Das by Nur Muhammad Khan of the Rupnagar police post at the village Malikhpur Rangharan, in Ghanaula Parganah, and sent to Sirhind  the following day. The Faujdar (Governor) of Sirhind, Dilawar Khan, ordered him to be detained in Bassi Pathan and reported the news to Dekhi. His arrest was made in July 1675 and he was kept in custody for over three months. He was then kept in an iron cage and taken to Delhi in November 1675.




The Guru was put in chains and ordered to be tortured until he would accept Islam. When he could not be persuaded to abandon his faith to save himself from persecution, he was asked to perform some miracles to prove his divinity. Refusing to do so, Tegh Bahadur was beheaded in public at Chandni Chowk on 24 November 1675. The Guru is also known as "Hind Di Chadar" i.e. "The Shield of India", suggesting that he gave up his life to protect the religious freedom of non Muslims in Mughal India.

By Nature



The beauty and the salubrious climate of the valley were known even from the ancient times. The mythological traditions supported fully by the research of geologists confirm that the valley originally was a huge lake called "Satisar", ( the land of goddess Sati, consort of Lord Shiva ) and its waters were blocked near Baramulla (ancient Varahmulla). The huge lake must have been twice the length and three times the width of the lake of Geneva, completely encircled by snowy mountains as high, and higher than Mount Blank, while in the immediately following glacial period, mighty glaciers came wending down to the Sindh, Lidder, and other valleys even to the edge of water."




Kashmir's greatest historian Kalhan writes about his native land: Kailash is the best place in the three worlds (Tri-lok), Himalayas the best place in Kailash, and Kashmir the best place in Himalayas"




According to the oldest extant book on Kashmir, "Nilmat Puran", in the Satisar lived a demon called Jalod Bowa, who tortured and devoured the people, who lived near mountain slopes. Hearing the suffering of the people, a great saint of our country, Kashyap by name, came to the rescue of the people here. After performing penance for a long time, the saint was blessed, and he was able to cut the mountain near Varahmulla, which blocked the water of the lake from flowing into the plains below. The lake was drained, the land appeared, and the demon was killed. The saint encouraged people from rest of India to settle in this valley. The people named the valley as Kashyap-Mar and Kashyap-Pura. The name Kashmir also implies land desicated from water: "ka" (the water) and shimeera (to desicate).




Hindu Rulers

During the long Peaceful Hindu rule, literature, art, philosophy, religion, was at glory. It was the most glorious and peaceful era, Kashmir ever had Shivism.

In the field of Philosophy Kashmir's contribution is the "Shiva School of thought", which assumed a distinctive character in the valley. "It is known as Trika (Triple) Shastra, as it pertains to the three vital matters of greatest importance namely (a) man (b) his universe and (c) fundamental principle which keeps on restoring order, equilibrium and harmony in the universe. The three great Acharyas of this school are Vasugupta, Kallatha and the great Abhinavagupta. Hundreds of other Kashmiri philosophers, and thinkers wrote masterpieces on this philosophy in the subsequent periods of our history.


Kashmiries are justly proud of the literary glories of their land. For centuries Kashmir was the house of the greatest Sanskrit scholars, and at least one great Indian religion of 'Shaivism' has found some of its most eloquent teachers on the banks of the Vitasta. Some of the greatest Sanskrit scholars and poets were born, and wrote in the valley and from it has issued in Sanskrit language a world famous collection of folk-lore." (Panchtantra.)

Buddhist Ruler

Another distinct school of philosophy was the emergence of Mahayana form of Buddhism during the time of Kanishka, when the 3rd Buddhist Council met here at Harwan. It was Vasumitra and Nagarjuna who gave shape and form to this new school of thought. This creed became very popular in China, Japan, Tibet and Ladakh. Nagarjuna has been raised to the exalted position of Buddistava and enjoys the reputation of being the greatest thinker of the age.


Establishment of Muslim Period

Rinchan was a Tibetan from Ladakh and he ruled Kashmir (1320-23) and was instrumental in establishing Islam in Kashmir.
Rinchan was a Tibetan prince from Ladakh who revolted against his uncle, who was the ruler of Ladakh, Rinchan was defeated and fled to Kashmir. King Sahdev of Kashmir appointed Rinchan as a minister. Shah Mir was a Persian Muslim Sufi. He was appointed as a minister in Kashmir by King Sahadev and he became good friend of Rinchan. Mongols under their leader Dulchoo, invaded Kashmir with 70,000 soldiers and defeated King Sahadev and Rinchan fled to Tiber. After the departure of Mongols the Kashmiri Chief of the state, Ramchandra, took advantage of the anarchy and occupied the throne. Rinchan defeated Ramchandra and became the ruler of Kashmir. Rinchan marriedKotarani  the daughter of Ramchandra to legitimize his rule and he agreed to convert to Hinduism. The adamant and stubborn Hindu Brahmin Pandirs did not accept Rinchin into Hinduism due to his race and ethnic origin.


The Muslium Sufi missionaries from the Middle East and Central Asia had settled in Kashmir and had converted many Kashmiri Pandits to Islam. There was competition and conflict between Buddhism and Hinduism in the court of King Rinchan. Shah Mir convinced Rinchan that he could choose to convert to Hinduism, Buddhism or Islam . Shah Mir suggested to Rinchan that he could convert to the religion of the first person they encounter next morning. The next morning when they left the palace the first person they met was Muslim Sifi Sayed Sharafuddin Bulbul Shah who was performing his  (Fajr) morning prayers. Rinchan converted to Islam and adopted the Muslim name of Sultan Sadruddin. According to historical sources, Shah Mir pre-planned the morning meeting with Bulbul Shah to convert King Rinchan to Islam.


Rinchan was attacked by rebels and was badly wounded and died in 1323 A.D. Shah Mir attacked his capital city and wanted to marry Kota Rani. Kota Rani fought bravely. Shah Mir then attacked her and was forcing her to marry him. Rather than marry him, according to the historian of that period Jonaraja, she committed suicide and offered her intestines to him as a wedding gift.

After the death of Queen Kota, Shah Mir ascended the throne under the name of Sultan Shamas-ud-din, and his dynasty ruled the state for 222 years. This period is one of the most important in the annals of Kashmir, in as much as Islam was firmly established here.

Mughal Period

The Moghuls remained in power here, from 1587 to 1752, and in this period undoubtedly the people enjoyed peace and orderly Govt. There were some rapacious officers, but on the complaint of the people the Moghul rulers immediately removed them. It was in 1579 that illuminated Moghul emperor Akbar visited Kashmir. About eighty thousand Kashmiris were entertained by Akbar at Id-Gah. During his reign Raja Todar Mal, the great Finance and Revenue Minister, made revenue settlement of the valley, which in its broad features forms the basis of the present revenue settlement in the valley. 




The great emperor visited the valley three times, and with him, came a large number of Moghul grandees, noblemen and army generals. The fame of the valley spread throughout the country and a very large number of people started to visit the valley. But actually it was in the time of Jahangir that the beauty of the state attracted thousands of visitors to the happy valley. The great emperor visited the State thirteen times. The Moghul rulers never came alone, but were always accompanied by hundreds of Nobles, Amirs and Umras, Princes and Army Generals. Jahangir came virtually, under the spell of the scenic beauty of the place, and wherever he found a hill coming down gently to a spring or a grove of majestic Chinar trees or a beautiful lake, he utilised the place for planting a pleasure garden. Shalimar and Nishat gardens on the banks of Dal Lake, would keep Jahangir's love for natural beauty ever fresh in our memory. He laid gardens at Achable and Verinag. Perhaps no other ruler has ever paid so much tribute to the beauty of Kashmir as Jahangir did.




Shah Jahan also visited the happy valley a number of times and he too was accompanied by a large number of nobles. Owing to the long peaceful rule of the three Moghul Kings, hundreds of people now began to come to Kashmir to find mental peace, to regain their health or attain spiritual salvation. Shah Jahan laid the garden of Chashmashai and also built a portion of Shalimar. The Moghul Governor Ali Marden Khan also laid out a number of gardens. Aurangzeb visited Kashmir only once in 1665.




Aurangezeb's reign was a signal for revolts and rebellions in several parts of the country. In distant parts of the empire commenced an era of lawlessness, anarchy and disorder. Many states became independent under their subedhars who founded new independent states. A reign of disorder also started in Kashmir. The Moghul Governors began to loot and plunder the people, and at the same time ruthlessly started a policy of religious bigotry and fanaticism. There was absolute chaos in northern India after the invasion of Nadir Shah of Persia. The people of Kashmir could no longer tolerate the misrule of Moghul satraps, and accordingly when Ahmad Shah Abdali of Kabul was at Lahore in 1752, two Kashmir nobleman Mir Muquim Kant and Khwaj'a Zahir Didmari, waited upon him at Lahore, and disgracefully requested him to bring Kashmir under his control.





Afghan Rulers : (1752 – 1819)

During this rule Sultan Sikandar imposed taxes on non–Muslims, forced conversions to Islam, and earned the title But–Shikan for destroying idols and temples.
Ahmad Shah, a free hooter of Nadir Shah gladly accepted this offer and immediately dispatched a strong and a powerful Afghan army under the command of Abdullah Khan lshik Aqasi, to occupy the valley. The Moghul satrap offered a strong resistance, but was defeated and the Afghan Governor planted the Afghan flag on the ramparts of Akbar's town at Nogar. The rule of Moghuls in Kashmir came to an end although it continued to exist in northern India, nominally up to 1857. Kashmir remained a dependency of Kabul rulers till 1819, roughly a period of 67 years.




The Pathan rule is the darkest period in the history of our state. The rulers of Kabul were great despots, and they ruled all the parts of their kingdom ruthlessly and with an iron hand. The corner stone of their policy was terror. As many as twenty eight Durrani Subedars governed Kashmir during these sixty seven years. The Kashmir nobleman had expected that Abdali would give them a good and a stable government, but the very first Afghan governor Abdullah Khan Aquasi, immediately after assuming powers started a reign of terror. People began to be looted and killed indiscriminately, and even the petty Afghan soldiers began to amass wealth by the foulest possible means. Most of the well to do people of the valley were summoned by the Governor to his palace, and ordered to surrender all their wealth on pain of death. Their houses were completely sacked, and many people were put to sword. There was complete gloom and despair on every side. All the prosperity of the valley was gone, and the people could not even move on the streets, for fear of being robbed of even their scanty clothing. Each and every day for a Kashmiri was a day of struggle and uncertainty. As ill luck would have it, only weak and worthless Amirs governed Kabul, after the death of Abdali. These Amirs would either be quickly deposed or assassinated. Naturally accession of every new Amir would mean appointment of a new Subedar in Kashmir. Hence every Governor expected his recall or dismissal at any time. This uncertainty made these rapacious governors ruthless, and they squeezed every penny from the people mercilessly.




It is true, that all sections of people suffered here during their time, but the chief victims of these fiends were the Hindus, Shias and Bombas of Jhelum valley. The Pathan rulers are now only remembered for their brutality and cruelty, and it is said of them that they thought no more of cutting off heads than plucking a flower.





Sikh Rulers: (1819-46)

Maharaja Ranjit Singh


Maharaja Ranjit Singh Leading Sikh Army


General Jorawar Singh in action
At last the reign of terror broke the patience of the peace loving people, and a deputation of Kashmiris led by Pandit Birbal Dhar, and his son Pandit Rajakak Dhar, left for Lahore and fervently requested Maharaja Ranjit Singh to conquer Kashmir. Three prominent Muslims helped Pandit Birbal Dhar in his escape from the valley. They were Abdul Qadoos Gojwari, Mallick Zulfiqar and Malik Kamgar. In 1819, 30,000 soldiers of Maharaja Ranjit Singh attacked Kashmir, defeated the Pathans, and the state became a part of Ranjit Singh's empire. On receipt of the news, Maharaja Ranjit Singh bestowed honours in Dhar family and Lahore was illuminated for three days, Sikh rule lasted for only 27 years and during this period 10 Governors administered the country one after another, out of whom the last two were Muslims. In the beginning Sikh rule also proved to be oppressive. " It must have been an intense relief ", writes Lawrence, " to all classes in Kashmir to see the downfall of the evil rule of Pathan, and to none was the relief greater than to the peasants who had been cruelly fleeced by the rapacious sardars of Kabul. I do not mean to suggest that the Sikh rule was benign or good, but it was at any rate better that that of the Pathans. "The Sikh rule over Kashmir lasted only for a brief span of time, during which the rulers at Lahore were far too pre-occupied at home to pay any attention to the affairs of this outlying province of theirs. The misery of the people increased due to natural calamities as well, such as premature snow falls, which would destroy a ripe rice crop leading to famines. These famines were followed by diseases like cholera and plague, resulting in a heavy loss of life. Thousands of people migrated to India during these hard days, and no wonder the population of the valley came down to two lakhs from 8 lakhs.




Such was the general condition of the state when Maharaja Ranjit Singh died in 1830. His death was a signal for the mutiny of Sikh Army which become uncontrollable, and plunge entire Punjab into confusion and chaos.



Dogra Rulers : (1846 1947)


Mahara Gulab Singh




The two Anglo-Sikh wars led to the final extinction of Sikh sovereignty in the Punjab and by virtue of the treaties of Lahore and Amritsar the British who had by now become undisputed masters of India, transferred and made over in perpetuity, the independent position to the Maharaja Gulab Singh and heirs male of his body, all the hilly and mountainous country situated to the east of Indus, and west of Ravi river. In consideration of this transfer Maharaja Gulab Singh paid to the British government the sum of 75 lakhs of rupees. Maharaja Gulab Singh entered Srinagar on 9th November 1848 at 8 in the morning. The Dogra royal line traces its descent from the ancient Kshatriyas mentioned frequently in Mahabharata. The Dogra ruler claimed that they belong to the Surya Vanshi (sun born) race. Maharaja Gulab Singh was a man of great vigour, foresight and determination. He repressed opposition and crime with an iron hand and he was universally feared and respected. He crushed gangs of organized plunderers, and murderers in the valley known as Galwans, and also broke the power of Bombas and Khokhas the inhabitants of Jhelum valley region below Varamulla, who brought havoc to every home in the valley by following a policy of arson and plunder. Large number of forts were built in their territory which were garrisoned with troops. It was because of his energetic measures that the conditions of the people improved and after many years some confidence was inspired in the permanence of administration. The people got a spell of peace and order, after centuries of lawlessness. The greatest service of the first Dogra ruler is the foundation he laid of the modern Jammu and Kashmir State. It was Gulab Singh who conquered one by one different places and regions of the state, Jammu,. Poonch, Ram Nagar, Basoli, Bhahderwah, Kishtwar, Bhimbar, Rajauri, Sikardu, Kharmang, Kiris, Khaplu, Sheghar, Astor Gilgit, Chitral, Yasin, Hunza, Nagar, and Punial. In the words of K. M. Panikar an area of more than eighty thousand sq. miles including part of Tibet, as well as part of Pamier, besides the genuinely kingdoms of Jammu and Kashmir came into Maharaja Gulab Singh's possession. This area had never been effectively united under one ruler and much of it with of course, the exception of the valley of Kashmir had never known any settled govt. " Writes P. N. Bamzai : " Mahraja Gulab Singh is the only Indian ruler to have carved out a state during the 19th century out of the wreckage of the great kingdom of Sikhs. Moreover he is the only Indian ruler to have extended the frontiers of India to their natural boundary ." Even Dr. Soft who is not very kind in his comments writes about him: "Gulab Singh was unquestionably a remarkable figure in the history of Northern India during the first half of the 19th Century. He was a distinguished soldier and diplomat and knew the state craft of his own days exceedingly well."


Maharaja Ranbir Singh-(1830 to 12th Sept. 1885)

The Maharaja died in 1857 after a rule of 11 years, during which period he laid the foundation of a sound system of administration. He was succeeded by Maharaja Ranbir Singh who ruled from 1857 to 1885. It was in his time that the rule of law commenced in the state. Almost all the laws, civil and criminal, which the British had introduced in India were with some modifications made applicable to the state. The various state departments were organized on the pattern of departments as these existed in British India. A slight attempt was also made to assess the amount of land revenue at a fixed amount.


Maharaja Pratap Singh-(1848-1925)
In 1885 Maharaja Sir Pratap Singh ascended the throne and he ruled for a period of 40 years. It is in the time of this Maharaja that the real modernisation of the state took place and several progressive reforms were carried through. Sir Walter Lawrence carried the first assessment of land revenue system in the state on scientific lines. The two mountain roads-Jhelum valley road and Banihal Cart road were built linking the state with the rest of India. A scheme for drainage of the valley reclaiming waste-land and preventing floods by digging flood channels was put into operation. Construction of water reservoir at Harwan and establishment of electric generating plant at Mohra was also undertaken during this period. Two colleges in the state besides large number of education institutions were also established by the order of the Maharaja. The administrative machinery was completely overhauled. There was development in the means of communication and telegraphs, telephones and post offices were opened in many places. The isolation of Kashmir from the rest of the country was now a thing of the past, and large number of people, mostly Europeans began to visit the valley. The fame of the valley, its climate and beauty spread in all parts of the world and it can truly be said that an era of tourist traffic started in right earnest in the state. Many efforts were made by Englishmen to obtain the right of purchasing land here for building houses. This would have turned Kashmir into a British Colony. The Maharaja stoutly refused to entertain the proposal, and this actually led to the construction of House Boats.


Maharaja Hari Singh

After the death of Maharaja Pratap Singh his nephew Maharaja Sir Hari Singh ascended the throne in 1925. He continued to govern the state till 1947. He was the last  King who ruled Jammu and Kashmir.



This mass Exodus of 1988-1989 of Kashmiri Pandits,  is nothing  new for us. When we were small, I remember, our grand parents tell 101 incidents of small and mass Exodus of Kashmiri Pandits. I was told that  once only 11-Families of Kashmiri Pandits stayed Behind in Kashmir, rest almost all the remaining Kashmiri Pandits enmass fled out of Kashmir.





One of the proof of the earlier en-mass Exodus is that all along the "Konkan Coast" which starts from Maharashtra and goes down right upto Tip of "Kanayakumari", there is a living community who are called as "Konkanis", their sur-names are KAMATH, PAI, SHANBHOUH, NAYAK etc, etc. Their proof of history says that they are the migrated Kashmiri Pandits from "Satisar Lake" and like Kashmiri Pandits they too are "SARSWAT & GOWDA-SARSWATS only". And they call them selves descendant Kashmirir Pandits. 


So the MORAL of my narration is that "IF WE Kashmiri Pandits, SURVIVED EARLIER MASS EXODUS, WE WILL & SHALL DEFINITELY SURVIVE THIS MASS EXODUS ALSO". It's just a question of time. No one can trample our "SPIRIT OF KASHMIRI PANDITISM"


From

Ashok    Parimoo

Chapter-4, Mughal Road link
Chapter-6, Mughal Road link


Chapter-6 to be continued

26 comments:

  1. Liked your last sentence. I hope a day will come when Kashmiri Pandits go back to valley and live without fear and persecution.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Aravind GJ,
      for appreciating my patience, effort and dedication, particularly for this blog regarding "The History of Kashmir and it's Rulers".

      Even I shall hope that your wishes may come true, if not in our life time, may be some time later.

      Any Positive comments from the readers of my blog, will deferentially boost and encourage me to write more on my Blog

      Regards
      Ashok Parimoo

      Delete
    2. Thank you Aravind GJ,
      for appreciating my patience, effort and dedication, particularly for this blog regarding "The History of Kashmir and it's Rulers".

      Even I shall hope that your wishes may come true, if not in our life time, may be some time later.

      Any Positive comments from the readers of my blog, will deferentially boost and encourage me to write more on my Blog

      Regards
      Ashok Parimoo

      Delete
  2. I am speechless, Baiji. This is a pictorial journey to my roots. Where did you get these precious pictures from.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Jaya,
      for appreciating my patience, effort and dedication, particularly for this blog regarding "The History of Kashmir and it's Rulers".

      I shall be posting more pictures of Old Kashmir in my coming blogs. I am happy and satisfied that my this particular blog has drawn you back to the nostalgic memories of your deep rooted roots

      Regards
      Ashok Parimoo

      Delete
  3. Great piece of History, Ashok. Congratulations for a job well done. The photographs were particularly poignant and conveyed the thought process of the subjects. Keep up the good work.
    Vijay.
    P.S. I am going to call my friend Shenoys here in Calgary who are konkans from Manglore area and tell them that they are our long lost brothers. Thanks bud

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Vijay Koul,

      For appreciating my patience, effort and dedication, particularly for this blog regarding "The History of Kashmir and it's Rulers".

      I hope and request that every Kashmiri must make their children also read this particular blog, so that they get familiarized with their roots and their ancestral history


      Thank you for your positive comments, because any Positive comments from the readers of my blog, will deferentially boost and encourage me to write more on my Blog

      Regards
      Ashok Parimoo

      Delete
  4. Its worth reading baiji! was amazed to read about the whole journey

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Minni

      I am happy that I could enlighten you regarding our history and our ancestral roots, what hardship they had undergone

      Regards
      Baiji uncle

      Delete
  5. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Respected Bhai ji

    Great Efforts by you for making this Blog.This will be wonderful eye opener for every Kashmiri Pandit who will go through this blog.

    I SALUTE you for this Great Job done.

    Keep it Up

    Deep Respect
    Tribwan jalal

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Tribwan,
      For appreciating my patience, effort and dedication, particularly for this blog regarding "The History of Kashmir and it's Rulers".

      I accept your one-handed SALUTE with my both handed SALUTE.

      I hope and wish that every Kashmiri must make their children also read this particular blog, so that they get familiarized with their roots and their ancestral history

      Thank you for your positive comments, because any Positive comments from the readers of my blog, will deferentially boost and encourage me to write more on my Blog

      Regards
      Baiji

      Delete
  7. Dear Ashokji
    Greetings.
    I often feel jealous of you for finding so much of time, patience and ardent intimacy in writing your experiences with a wonderful skill of narration.
    It is indeed a privilege to go through your writings.
    Keep writing and encourage youngsters to explore the best from the nature
    With good wishes
    KSN Adiga

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Adiga Sir,
      Adiga Sir, you are the one who always keeps boosting my morals every time, those in turn keep me encouraged to write more and more blogs with positive attitude.

      Regards
      Ashok Parimoo

      Delete
  8. Hi Ashok, I hope everything is well with you. In case you are wondering if I am sick or have a broken arm and unable to write to you and not answered your blog, I will try to explain.

    First, it is fantastic to hear from you and all about your trip. I had several unsuccessful attempts to post to your blog and for some reason unknown to me, it would not accept my notes. I will need the help from my son I guess. I have read all of them so far. I am sorry not to contact you sooner but am now frustrated with my blog attempts and am emailing instead.

    Thank you for keeping me on your mailing and please keep me on it. When reading your descriptions, it's like being there myself. Some say that you can travel the world by reading books, but as you probably agree, there is NO substitute for being there in person.

    My wife, Ella, and I talk about seeing you here at Muna's wedding. We hope you can visit Amarjit again some day. I will surely be here to meet up with you.

    Please keep in touch. You are always in our thoughts.

    Yours truly,
    Wayne

    ReplyDelete
  9. Baiji
    This is awesome!
    Jeevan Zutishi

    ReplyDelete
  10. Respected Ashok Ji,
    Thank you very much for giving a thought provoking peep into Kashmir History. The photographs are awesome. It is a must for every research scholar to go through it.Not only the researchers but it is must for everybody particularly for the KASHMIR WATCHERS.
    With warm regards
    V K WATTAL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wattalji Namaskar

      Thank you, for appreciating my patience, effort and dedication, particularly for this blog regarding "The History of Kashmir and it's Rulers".

      I hope and wish that every Kashmiri Pandit must make their children also read this particular blog, so that they get familiarized with their roots and their ancestral history

      Thank you for your positive comments, because any Positive comments from the readers of my blog, will deferentially boost and encourage me to write more on my Blog

      Regards
      Ashok Parimoo

      Delete
  11. Bai ji, i in particular had underestimated your genius, sorry, your in depth study, patience tons of it, dedication single minded resolve, has produces a history in gem,well crafted and placed in its proper perspective,.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Veerji Namaskar

      On many occasions, haven't I told you earlier also that "PARIMOO'S HAVE DNA MUTATIONS"? So the flare of writing comes to all of us, (Bhaisahab, Viju, you and now me) because of our Grand father "Tara Chand Parimoo" DNA-blood line.

      You and me have inherited even the stubbornness of our Grand father "Tara Chand Parimoo" ,for his excellent Persian poetry, who refused to accept Jawahar Nagar land as a reward from Maharajah Hari Singh of Jammu & Kashmir.

      So, the DNA-blood line can bring colour any day, later or sooner.

      Baiji

      Delete
  12. Parimooji, Excellent writing with old snaps..... Clean picture about Kashmir....Keep it up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Deepak for liking my blog

      Regards
      Ashok Parimoo

      Delete
  13. Hello Ashok ,

    Istly I salute ur passion . 2ndly u hv refreshed my the old history of kashmir (j&k) particulary about kashmiri pandits community . Really the kashmir was paradise of india but unfortunately...... .... Anyway as per the kashmir history in Janurary 19,1990 the kashmiri pandits were exhausted from kashmir but this was not the first time when the pandits were thrown away , as per history this was sixth or seventh time when the kashmiri pandits were excruciated and the pandits went an exile in the own country. In past the people fleed to mountains of j&k like kistawar , badhrawa ,doda and poonch etc. but this time they left in the other states of india.

    But I salute and appreciate my community how they faced the odd days and then kept their moral and honour high and managed their livelihood and re- settlement in other parts of the country. So there is no question to go back kashmir.
    Lastly I pray for the community , "God Bless Them"

    VIJAY JALALI

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Vijay Jalali for appreciating my sincere effort, dedication and patience to write this particular blog. Though you too know it well that I am total ignorant of my culture, history and rituals. But some some how even I am amazed who I produced such a precise details of our Kashmiri history and it;s rulers.
      But I am very happy with the end result.

      I wish every Kashmiri Pandit tries to make his children read this blog of mine, so that at least they may come to know in brief history about our heritage.

      Anyway I even appreciate your contribution regarding the information of earlier days Exodus of Kashmiri Pandits to Kisthward, Badharwa, Poonch, etc.
      Regards
      Baiji

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  14. Dear dad...u am amazed.....I knew that u were our short book of stories...but this is amazing....I am sooooo proud of u....I hope mom has Wi-Fi...she would love it....love u dad....

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